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heatherbelle
15-12-07, 06:25 AM
I realise I'm starting to look forward to hearing the Canadian bands, as well as other non-Scottish bands. I'm wondering if that's because I AM Scottish, and find the 'other nationality' bands refreshing, or whether it's because there is something inherently different about 'Canadian' bands or 'American' or 'Australian' etc bands. Does the character of the country you live in, get into the music of the band and the way the band plays? Does the attitude of the people in a certain country influence the music of a band? I realise you could have a band in Papua New Guinea that's full of Scots and so on, but is there anything in this question, or not??? For instance is there anything Canadian in the way a Canadian band plays The Battle's O'er? I've a feeling there might be.:flowers:

portlypiper
15-12-07, 10:40 AM
Good post Heather, we must really thank the Scottish Lion 78th for changing the whole style of competition piping many years ago, I remember at the time their modern attitude was frowned upon for being modern and not contemporary, but if you look at the bands that have since come to the fore ( FMM, SFU, Victoria Police etc ) in my opinion it spawned a new direction of piping and took it to a completely different level.

Long may it continue.

:party:

jjpiper
15-12-07, 02:51 PM
There always seems to be trends in sport that go up and down. At first it is frowned upon to be new/different/exciting and then when it is finally accepted the old stuff is frowned on. Same goes for figure skating, hockey, etc. Don't know if it is regional or nationalistic.

PowerBoozer007
15-12-07, 04:17 PM
I would say that in these days of the internet, piping has become borderless!

I can only speak of the Ontario scene, but what the 78th played back then was par for the course. They opened the door, but they didn't invent it!

You had other bands like St. Thomas Police under PM Gord Tuck putting out some interesting medlies as his first instrument was the fiddle, City of Guelpn under PM Ed Neigh played some really adventurous stuff that was frowned on in the 70's. God forbid you played harmonies and a long slow airs with bridging too.

Clan MacFarlane was the band to beat back then, but they played a medley much more suited to Scotland which was really reserved in that Era.
City of Toronto had a neat band playing great stuff as did Triumph Street back then too.

Have to remember that the 78th didn't win the medley competition when they won in 1987.

Itchyknee
15-12-07, 07:29 PM
I agree with John. With the internet, CDs and many bands travelling to overseas competitions bands are not nearly as isolated as they once were.

Vikki
15-12-07, 10:12 PM
just a little point... a lotta of the "big" bands are mixed nationalities now. get a lot of players from other countries, so does that maybe influence stuff a bit as well?? suppose that point springs to mind for me considering i'm one of those

Glyn_Mo
20-12-07, 05:20 PM
just a little point... a lotta of the "big" bands are mixed nationalities now. get a lot of players from other countries, so does that maybe influence stuff a bit as well?? suppose that point springs to mind for me considering i'm one of those

True, in Manawatu, as well as the Kiwis, we've got a number of UK-based players and Aussies and South Africans too. Don't know if it really has any influence on the music choice though...

PowerBoozer007
20-12-07, 05:28 PM
The Viccy Police were a mixed bunch too, but didn't Mark Saul write much of their stuff?

Glyn_Mo
20-12-07, 05:50 PM
The Viccy Police were a mixed bunch too, but didn't Mark Saul write much of their stuff?

Yup, Murray Blair too. Think they may have played a few of Brian Lamond's too.

PowerBoozer007
20-12-07, 07:28 PM
Yep, it's all coming back to me now, great composers and awsum band!

Nat Russell From Ireland as the PM, Adrian Melvin from Dundee, do you know some more names and where are they now?

I know Adrian is living in Chicago and helping the Midlothian band!

jjpiper
21-12-07, 05:50 AM
Maybe there should be an Olympics where people from each country compete together to see which country is best. Would it work and who would win. Now this thread can go on forever.

janelleTG
21-12-07, 05:59 AM
Maybe there should be an Olympics where people from each country compete together to see which country is best. Would it work and who would win. Now this thread can go on forever.

Would it be a 'Where you live' type of competition or a 'Country of Origin' competition? :bg:

janelleTG
21-12-07, 06:01 AM
In the local competition here, you can always tell which bands are looking at competing overseas, as their Drum Corps adopt the style played overseas.

Robbie.Crow
21-12-07, 10:04 AM
Scotland!

Glyn_Mo
21-12-07, 10:44 AM
Yep, it's all coming back to me now, great composers and awsum band!

Nat Russell From Ireland as the PM, Adrian Melvin from Dundee, do you know some more names and where are they now?

I know Adrian is living in Chicago and helping the Midlothian band!

Murray Blair's in Edinburgh. Brian Lamond's PM of Dysart. Think a lot of the rest of them are in the Oz Highlanders.

heatherbelle
22-12-07, 01:11 AM
Maybe there should be an Olympics where people from each country compete together to see which country is best. Would it work and who would win. Now this thread can go on forever.

The judging panel would need to be international, and maybe judges from different countries would have differing views about what 'best' meant. I've a slight feeling that the Canadians and Americans are musically more receptive to new ideas and are bigger minded, or more open or something. It seems to me it comes across in the music. I'm not sure about other countries as I haven't noted enough about them. We Scots CAN be dour about change and development, not just in the pipe band music sphere, and as such risk being overtaken by others who are more broad minded. There again, it depends what the judges want. Do they want tight, traditional, familiar repertoire and form, or do they want musically adventutous, contemporary, new working of old standards kind of thing. Maybe the former, but in time it'll no doubt change.